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1.- Germany was a legacy; Argentina only part of the moment. Löw’s team represented the evolution of the Tiki Taka. Sabella’s side was one that was figuring out itself as they went along. Romero ended up pulling together a pretty good World Cup and silencing the critics.
Just for Kicks; Germany en route to become the new Spain 
07/14/2014
 
July 13, 2014; Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL; Germany midfielder Andre Schurrle (9) celebrates with the world cup trophy after the championship match of the 2014 World Cup against the Argentina at Maracana Stadium. Germany won 1-0.  Mandatory Credit: Tim Groothuis/Witters Sport via USA TODAY Sports

1.- Germany was part of a legacy; Argentina only part of the moment. Löw’s team represented the evolution of the Tiki Taka. Sabella’s side was one that was figuring out itself as they went along. Romero ended up pulling together a pretty good World Cup and silencing critics. Mascherano lived up to his nickname “el jefecito” (the little boss) and stole some of the headlines away from Messi and Di Maria. Germany was a twenty-three headed monster that only moved when and where Löw told them to; Argentina on the other hand was coerced to become a team after somebody forgot to tell Messi he was playing in the World Cup.


2.- We missed Di Maria in the Final. It makes me wonder what we would be talking about today if he had been on the pitch. Di Maria and the Argentinian strikers had the luxury of not working under pressure, because it all fell on Messi. When Di Maria came to terms with this fact he certainly assumed the secondary role that was vacant leading to the World Cup. From all the high caliber strikers of this talent-stocked team, he was the only one who lived up to the expectation. Higuaín, Agüero and Palacio fell short when the finish line was in sight.


3.- Less talk but more titles. That seems to be the motto in today’s manager sphere. Overlooking some exceptions like Pep and Mourinho, the most successful managers of our time have been those who speak with their actions and not their words. Sabella and Löw didn’t need to relay on their words to make history. Alejandro is a shy character, which enables him to neatly fall together with Messi. Löw, of a stern nature, can only be seen smiling when his team is lifting the World Cup. Words don’t equate to titles, just as celebrating doesn’t compare to magnitude, because if that were the case, we would be talking about how Löw simply won a friendly against Argentina and Miguel Herrera the World Cup against Croatia.


4.- Kroos got the hint that being transferred to Real Madrid meant that his performance could lag a bit in the final stages of the World Cup. If throughout the World Cup he has been meticulous and almost surgical with his passing and positioning on the pitch, against Argentina all that could’ve been forgotten with a simple mistake. Even if we overlook his perfect pass to Higuaín, Toni had the chance to drill the ball in the back of the net, but instead chose to finesse it and sent it flying to the side of Romero’s goal. Regardless, Kroos was still one of the players in the World Cup, if not the best, even though FIFA believes otherwise.


5.- Neuer is the prototype for the goalkeeper of the future. He is ahead of our time. Manuel can be as still as a statue when he wants to. His arm as stiff as a steel beam blocking Benzema’s shot and public enemy number one for the Argentinians. Higuaín’s bruises after their clash may amount to this. A midfielder with gloves. Ask the Algerian side who are probably still dazed and confused for having the eleventh player on the pitch actually play the role. An outstanding talent that is ahead of his time.

June 30, 2014; Porto Alegre, BRAZIL; Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer during the round of sixteen match against Algeria in the 2014 World Cup at Estadio Beira-Rio.  Mandatory Credit: Tim Groothuis/Witters Sport via USA TODAY Sports

6.- Messi didn’t deserve the Golden Ball. Matter of fact he didn’t even want it. I think his only thought as he lined up to take that final free kick was how hot the shower would be when he reached the locker room. It must be hard to have it all and still have people clamoring for more. Argentina set itself up so that Messi was in a position to make or break their World Cup dreams. If they would have won yesterday the glory would’ve been equally spread among his teammates, but in the face of defeat he is left standing as alone as they left him to take that free kick.


7.- To Germany, I critique the same thing I saw in Spain as a growing problem. Their touches, that on occasion can become so monotonous that even the team itself might fall victim of its numbing effects; leaving them exposed to a quick counterattack that might cost them the game is a single mindless mistake. You can appreciate this more in the stadium than on TV. Germany’s left side was almost always exposed. The German’s corralled the ball to Lahm’s side and perfectly stationed themselves. Germany leaves this World Cup writing another chapter in its already rich legacy; it is hard for me to admit, but we might be in front of another superpower like the Spanish were from 2008 to 2012.


8.- It feels so good to see Argentina lose. I admit that a child shouldn’t make fun of his father’s woes. They will forever be Mexico’s superiors thanks to Osorio and Aguirre. But damn does it feel good. 

 
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